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Keep Your Home or Business Safe by Scheduling Your Level II Inspection and Chimney Sweep

If you use a furnace or fireplace in your home or business, there is almost nothing more important than your regular chimney sweeps and annual inspections. If your appliance and chimney has not changed, and you plan to continue use in the same way you have, then a level I inspection should be appropriate. However, there are three levels of inspections offered by certified chimney sweeps, and it’s important to learn which one you need!

What is a Level II Inspection?Scheduling Early Chimney Inspections - Suffolk NY - Chief Chimney

 

In a level II chimney inspection the chimney sweep will examine the readily accessible portions of your chimney exterior, interior, appliance, and chimney connection. The technician will evaluate basic soundness of the chimney structure, flue, appliance installation and connections, and verify the chimney is free of obstruction or debris. All of these elements of the inspection exist for a level I inspection. However, a level II inspection also includes all accessible portions or the chimney interior and exterior, including attics, crawlspaces, and basements. During this inspection the technician will also address any clearance issues with area combustibles.

A level II inspection also includes a visual inspection of the interior flue lining, surfaces, and joints, whether by video device or other method.

What a Level II ISN’T

A level II chimney inspection requires no heavy machinery. If you schedule a level II inspection and the chimney sweep wants to add or remove any permanent pieces or structure to your appliance or venting system, that is work for a level III inspection.

If your certified chimney sweep notes hazardous structural issues or other dangerous problems, a level III inspection may be required.

When To Schedule a Level II

The Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) recommends a level II inspection for a few reasons, and as of 2000 the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) requires a level II inspection for the following reasons (as per NFPA 211):

  • The property is sold or transferred
  • Fuel type is changed
  • The chimney flue is relined
  • An appliance is replaced or added
  • A part or parts of the heating system has malfunctioned
  • The chimney or flue has experienced a fire
  • The home or business has endured an earthquake or equally catastrophic occurrence
  • BTU rating has changed

While it’s important to schedule a level II inspection for these reasons, you may also need a level II inspection if the chimney sweep finds something concerning in your level I inspection.

Learn more about chimney inspections with this informational article and tutorial.

Call a Professional Today

Only a certified chimney sweep should perform level I, II, and III chimney inspections. Even insurance companies trust the sweeps to make such an assessment, and often rely on a level II inspection to determine where a chimney or flue fire originated.

Our technicians at Chief Chimney Services are licensed, certified, and insured. Our Master Sweep has 30+ years experience for all of your appliance and venting system needs. When Chief Chimney performs an inspection we use a CCTV video camera to thoroughly examine your venting system. We also provide a detailed report of our findings for your knowledge and your records.

To schedule your appointment, call or schedule online today. A technician is standing by.

By John Pilger on February 10th, 2016 | Tagged with: Tags: , , | Comments Off on Keep Your Home or Business Safe by Scheduling Your Level II Inspection and Chimney Sweep

All You Need to Know about Glazed Creosote Removal

If you have a wood or oil-burning furnace or fireplace, you may have heard about glazed creosote. Information online, in the hardware store, and from well-meaning friends or loved ones may be confusing.

Chief Chimney Services has all the information you need to keep your home or business safe from glazed creosote.

What is it?

get rid of creosote - Smithtown NY - Chief Chimney Services

Creosote is a highly flammable, tar-like substance created when fuel is burned at high temperatures. This powdery residue can remain on the walls of a smoke box or chimney and compound over time in several layers. A professional will sometimes call this buildup glazed creosote, or level three creosote. At this level of buildup the creosote bubbles and boils when high-temperature fires burn in the furnace, then cools into a solid, very flammable, mass.

This hardened buildup can become a hazard as it begins to obstruct the chimney, causing the heat, smoke, and gases to slow, and begin to heat the flammable substance.

CSIA-Certified Chimney Technicians

At Chief Chimney Services, we are qualified, licensed, and insured to clean and repair damage caused by glazed creosote. Our licensed chimney sweeps are the difference in chimney maintenance. Using the proper tools we can transform the glazed creosote into a more pliable substance to be easily removed.

What We Do

The Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) recommends regular chimney cleaning and inspections, and urges consumers to not depend only on chemical cleaning products like those found in hardware stores. A licensed and experienced chimney sweep provides fast service, inspections, and offers expert advice.

The way our chimney sweeps remove the creosote will depend on the consistency of the buildup. If it is gummy or moist we may use a chemical designed to transform the creosote to a powdery substance. This allows our sweeps to brush it out. These chemicals are safe for your home or business, and our chimney sweeps are qualified and experienced in their use. If a chemical remover isn’t needed, we use tools and brushes to detach the creosote from the chimney walls. After the creosote is properly removed, the chimney returns to safe function.

What You Can Do

As a home or business owner you can regularly check your firebox and chimney for signs of creosote buildup. Burning a high-temperature fire, with plenty of oxygen to the flames, helps the fuel burn completely. Also, burning proper fuel can help prevent creosote buildup. Proper wood should be cut and set aside to dry. This process could take as little as six months, or up to two years for denser types of wood.

Creosote is caused primarily when wood isn’t completely burned. So using improperly seasoned wood raises the risk of buildup.

In addition to burning proper fuel, home and business owners should not skip an annual cleaning and inspection. A regular cleaning should remove creosote before it reaches level three buildup.

Call or set up an appointment online and let Chief Chimney Services make the difference for your home or business today.

By John Pilger on January 27th, 2016 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , | Comments Off on All You Need to Know about Glazed Creosote Removal

How to handle a chimney fire

Homeowners hope they never have to deal with a fire, but it’s something every homeowner should be prepared for. If your home has a fireplace or heating stove, you also should be prepared to deal with a chimney fire.

Recognizing the signs of a chimney fire

How to handle a chimney fire - Suffolk County NY - Chief ChimneyFirst, you should know the signs of a chimney fire. Oftentimes, chimney fires are extremely dramatic and obvious. Flames and sparks shoots out the top of the chimney, dense smoke billows out, and people inside the home hear a roaring noise like a low-flying plane. Other times, however, chimney fires are far more subtle. Some smoke may begin entering the house, or there may be a popping or “raining” sound from inside the chimney.

Responding to a chimney fire

If you believe you are experiencing a chimney fire, your first priority should be to get everyone out of the home safely. While most metal chimney are made to withstand a chimney fire, there is a risk that the fire could escape and ignite your home’s structure. Because of that risk, you should immediately call the fire department. If you feel safe doing so, you can close the doors to the fireplace, and turn off any fans or blowers. Once outside, you can spray water on your roof to prevent any sparks coming from the chimney from igniting your roof.

Following a chimney fire, your chimney should be inspected by a certified chimney sweep before you attempt to burn another fire. A sweep will clean the chimney and inspect the structure. While metal flues can withstand temperatures up to 2,000 degree, they still may be damaged by a fire. The extreme temperatures of a chimney fire can cause major damage to a masonry chimney. Mortar can melt and bricks can crack, compromising the chimney structure.

Preventing a chimney fire

As the saying goes, “Clean chimneys don’t catch fire.” The majority of chimney fires are caused by a buildup of creosote, which is extremely flammable. The best way to protect your home from a chimney fire is to have your chimney swept by a certified chimney sweep at least once a year, and potentially more frequently if you rely on a woodstove as a main source of heat. Your chimney sweep will remove all creosote buildup from your flue, and will look for any signs of chimney damage or weakness.

Creosote forms when smoke cools near the top of your flue, causing condensation. Burning properly seasoned hardwood that is the right size for your fireplace can slow the buildup of creosote in your fireplace. Also, make sure you always burn fires with your damper fully open, and if you have an open-hearth fireplace, never close the fireplace doors when a fire is burning. Having a partially closed damper or closed fireplace doors interrupts the draft of smoke out of your chimney, causing smoke to linger longer and encouraging creosote buildup.

If you’re overdue for a chimney sweeping, or if you’re concerned that your chimney has experienced a fire, call the experts at Chief Chimney Services. We can help keep your home and family safe from the risk of a chimney fire.

By John Pilger on December 8th, 2015 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on How to handle a chimney fire

NFPA Chimney Inspections

Chimney inspections are important to identify any potential fire, health, and structure damage risks that may be present in your home. The certified chimney professionals from Chief Chimney Services in Long Island know how important annual inspections are for homeowners to receive. Unfortunately, Chief has also witnessed the consequences when homeowners rationalized that they don’t need an inspection or procrastinated at having the repair recommendations performed.

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Whether you live in Long Island or anywhere else, it is for your own protection that you follow the recommendations from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and have a professional inspect your chimney. The key word is “professional”. The worst case scenario is you to pay someone who just claims to be able to inspect your chimney and you think you are safe, and then experience the unthinkable because the person you did business with was not qualified to perform the inspection. How does a homeowner know what should be included in a proper inspection? The NFPA instituted guidelines for homeowners and inspectors.

When it came to determining what components were to be inspected and the appropriate inspection for the homeowner’s circumstances, prior to 2000, homeowners we left at the mercy and judgement of the person conducting their inspection. In January of 2000, the National Fire Protection Association defined and standardized what inspections should include. These standards can be found in code NFPA 211 (Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents and Solid Fuel Burning Appliances). There are three levels of inspection and each has a very clear definition for the inspector and homeowner, alike.

The Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) has included a detail explanation of each of the three levels of inspections along with guidelines when each is appropriate on their website. Click here to view those videos.

Both the CSIA and NFPA are very clear that homeowners have an annual chimney inspection by a CSIA certified technician performed every year before you begin to use your heating system. Inspections can be best performed in the summertime when the chimney and furnace are not in use and weather conditions make a visual inspection easier. However, inspections can be performed throughout the year weather permitting.

If your inspector does find an issue or issues that need to be addressed, it is important to take care of the repairs promptly. Inadequately functioning chimneys and their components can lead to fire hazards, toxic gas poisoning, as well as water damage to the interior and exterior of your home. And if there were ever a time to be proactive, it is when your family’s health and safety are at stake.

It is our recommendation to you that you review the three levels of inspections and discuss your need for a proper inspection with your CSIA certified chimney professional. If you live in Long Island, Chief Chimney Service is available to answer all your questions and perform the proper inspection following NFPA standards. If you don’t live in Chief’s service area consult the CSIA website, Angie’s List, and the BBB to find a qualified inspector.

By John Pilger on August 26th, 2015 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on NFPA Chimney Inspections

The Importance of CSIA Certification

When your health and safety are at risk, you need do business with a trusted professional to ensure that the services you receive and the one who provides them have your best interests as the top priority. Chief Chimney Services in Long Island, NY recognizes the importance of providing you with technicians who are certified by the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA). CSIA is the industry’s eminent non-profit organization dedicated to advancing “public awareness while educating and certifying industry professionals.”

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What does CSIA certification mean to you? Trust!

CSIA credentials are a litmus test when deciding which company you trust with maintaining and repairing your chimney and related venting structures and systems. When your systems are not functioning properly your family’s health and safety are subject to the risks of fire and toxic gas poisoning, and the financial risk as a result of structural damage to your home and property. All of which can be avoided by having a CSIA technician perform your annual cleaning and inspections and making repairs as needed.

When you need chimney or related services it is always in your best interest to protect yourself from false claims and only do business with a company whose technicians are CSIA certified. A CSIA certified technician has completed both classroom and hands-on training under skilled professionals. Graduates of the CSIA have demonstrated their expertise in technical abilities, and local fire and safety codes. Their trainers, as well as the technicians seeking certification, are committed to education, professionalism, excellence, and most important, your safety. These core values, along with technical expertise, must be demonstrated in order to receive CSIA credentials.

It’s very easy to get t-shirt printed that says “chimney sweep” and prey on unsuspecting home owners who have no way to measure the competence of the person wearing the t-shirt. When you do business with a professional chimney company who insists that their technicians are CSIA certified, it gives you important insight to the high standards the company maintains. Furthermore, consider, the chimney company that values the CSIA credentials and maintains a membership in good standing has invested time and money to earn, maintain, and renew their credentials above and beyond anyone off the street who calls himself a chimney sweep. The CSIA credentials are “the hallmark of excellence among chimney and venting professionals”, and have been since 1983. Even the Better Business Bureau recommends using a CSIA certified chimney sweep as one of the ways to measure the integrity of the person you invite to your home.

Your CSIA technician has the training to properly use the professional tools needed to do a thorough cleaning and inspection, the knowledge of your structure as well as local fire codes, and the expertise to know what to look for during the inspection and how to make any necessary repairs in the most effective and cost efficient method available.

To summarize, following these recommendations by the CSIA is the best way to ensure the quality of the chimney and related work you need. Click here to follow their five recommendations. If you are located in the Long Island area, Chief Chimney Service is CSIA recommended and wants to add you to our list of satisfied customers.

By John Pilger on August 9th, 2015 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on The Importance of CSIA Certification

Don’t Wait Untill Fall To Have Your Chimney Inspected

Savvy homeowners know that they should have their chimneys cleaned once a year. What you may not realize is the mindset of having your chimney cleaning done in the fall is not always the best practice. The chimney professionals from Chief Chimney Services in Central Suffolk County New York want homeowners to know that summer and spring are two of the best times to set an appointment for your annual inspection and cleaning.

Having a clear view of your chimney structure without regard to weather conditions also enables your chimney professional to block potential entrances for animals, birds, and rodents before they search for a warm place to spend the winter and enter your home via your chimney.

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Summertime offers some distinct advantages when having your chimneys inspected and swept. First and perhaps the most obvious is the weather. It’s much easier to navigate on a roof that is not covered with ice and snow. Also, it is much easier to do a thorough inspection of the chimney, masonry, flashing, chimney cap, shingles, etc. when the area is not covered in ice and snow. If repairs are needed, extreme cold can affect the effectiveness of some sealant and masonry products. As the fall weather approaches, homeowners recognize the change of weather means fireplaces will once again be fired up and they need to be prepared, that’s why chimney companies are flooded with calls after Labor Day. Ashley Eldridge, Director of Education for the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) explains, “By scheduling (in summertime), you will have time to complete any necessary repairs before the start of the heating season. Not to mention the peace of mind you will get knowing that your fireplace or wood stove is ready to go for those dark days of winter.”

While sometimes spring rains impede inspections, the rainy season also allows your chimney professional to check for leaks and seepage and be pro-active with repair measures, that’s why springtime is also a good time for a chimney inspection, weather permitting.

There is also more appointment time flexibility when you schedule your appointment outside the busiest time of the year, which starts Labor Day and carries through until spring.
Having a clear view of your chimney structure without regard to weather conditions also enables your chimney professional to block potential entrances for animals, birds, and rodents before they search for a warm place to spend the winter and enter your home via your chimney.

Most chimney professionals are equipped to do service calls all year long and only the most extreme weather conditions prevent them from doing their work. The important thing to remember is to have a safety inspection and cleaning performed by a CSIA professional before using your fireplace for the first time each year.

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 211 also states that, “Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents shall be inspected at least once a year for soundness, freedom from deposits, and correct clearances. Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs shall be done if necessary.”

When you follow the recommendations of the chimney experts you know you will be saving on utility costs by ensuring your heating mechanisms are operating at maximum efficiency, and your family is safe for fire and toxic gas hazards.

Don’t wait, contact your local chimney professional today, and if you live in Suffolk County, call Chief Chimney Services.

By John Pilger on July 28th, 2015 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Don’t Wait Untill Fall To Have Your Chimney Inspected

We Serve Suffolk County

There is no better place in the county for us to provide comprehensive chimney services than in Suffolk County, New York. Chief Chimney Services has been part of the Suffolk Country business community for over 30 years. Over that time we have seen a lot of changes to our area; however, nothing can offset the rich history and the spirit of past and current residents.

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For those who have never been to Suffolk County, let us introduce you. Long Island is in Suffolk County. The peninsula extends into the Atlantic Ocean. The world renowned Hamptons is also part of Suffolk County. The area is characterized by its beaches, wharfs, farmlands, seaside villages, rolling hills, and farmlands. Long Island was named one of the Top Ten Wine Regions in the World by Wine Enthusiast magazine. Dr. Beach, a noted, beach expert, named Main Beach in East Hampton the Best Beach in America.

The first inhabitants of Long Island were the Algonquin Indians. The Algonquins and others who came to settle in the area were attracted by the waterways, local game, rich farmland, and native nuts, berries, and grains. Those interested in the development and chronological history of Suffolk County can click here.

There are almost 300 places in Suffolk County currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places which preserve the area’s rich history. Click here for a complete list.

The Vanderbilt name is synonymous with Suffolk County. Visitors and residents enjoy visiting the mansion, museum, and planetarium on the Vanderbilt estate. For more information click here.

It’s the local nuances of an area that gives it its character. Here are a few bits of information to enlighten and amuse you.

  • You can never get really lost on Long Island.All you have to do is drive until you come to water and then turn around, “re-routing re-routing”.Suffolk County is described as an “epicurean’s dream”.
  • “The word “fresh” takes on a different meaning. Here, the menu’s ‘catch of the day’ was likely hauled in that morning from the waters off our Island shores, prepared and served with vegetables – picked from a nearby farm – seasoned with herbs from the garden then paired with a Pinot Grigio from a vineyard just down the road.” Click here for more information on great dining experiences.

Suffolk County has several aviation museums and places to explore science, mathematics, history, energy, astronomy, and technology. To learn more click here.

Those interested in live entertainment will not be disappointed. The theatres and auditoriums in the North Shore area have performances for all entertainment genres and audiences. Click here for more information.

New York City is close enough to visit when you want to participate in all that one of the world’s most dynamic cities offer, yet far enough away not to interfere with the tranquility and charm and quaintness this historic county offers.

Quality of life is important to residents visiting in Suffolk County. Chief Chimney Services is proud to maintain chimneys and fireplaces and offer comprehensive and related service to new residents of Suffolk County as well as those whose ancestors are part of the area’s history.

What Is Creosote?

What Is Creosote? The term creosote in relation to fireplaces and chimney occurs when the by-products of wood are not totally burned off and the residue travels in the smoke as a vapor. When it is cooled to a liquid it coats whatever it encounters. The wood-tar substance is a blackish brown sticky gooey oil mixture that builds up on the interior surfaces of your chimney and fireplace. It is extremely combustible. Due to the hazardous nature of creosote and its offensive odor, Chief Chimney Services takes special care to remove it and protect homeowners from fire and toxic gas risks associated with creosote.

The Hearth.com website explains, “Creosote buildup is pretty sneaky. You may not notice it at first but it tends to feed on itself. As it builds up, it restricts the flow in the chimney and/or stove pipes. This slows the smoke on its way out, allowing more time for it to cool and for the creosote to condense and deposit on itself thus further restricting the flow.”.

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The fire hazard occurs when it is ignited by a hot fire. Pieces of the built up creosote can also become loose and flake and travel upwards to your roof, or down your chimney into your fireplace and into your home. No matter the direction, the result of burning creosote is no good. A traveling piece of burning creosote can bring on a dangerous and expansive fire.

The inspectapedia website lists these considerations about creosote build up:

  • The temperature of the chimney. Consider long low smoldering fires make more creosote that hotter roaring fires
  • The wood to sap ratio of the wood you burn, the greener the wood the more moisture and the more creosote
  • The moisture content of the wood, wet wood burns more slowly and produces more creosote
  • The chimney size, height, location, and construction materials also influence the buildup of creosote.

There are important things for homeowners to understand about creosote that you need to know if you are even considering to attempt to remove creosote buildup yourself. First, without the professional equipment and cameras a chimney professional uses, you are not able to view the entire length of your chimney and therefore you may not be aware of the buildup that occurs out of sight which still puts you at risk. There are two other considerations as well as access. Dislodging the creosote is extremely dangerous for several reasons. First, as you chip away at the creosote you may do damage to the underlying chimney structure. Worse you will be breathing the extremely toxic materials even if you wear a mask. Worst yet, if you dislodge the creosote it may travel in the smoke and downdrafts of future fires and ignite whatever it lands upon.

Creosote inspection and removal is critical to the safety and security of your home and best done by a technician certified by the Chimney Safety Institute of America. CSIA certified technicians know the proper methods, cleaning agent, and tools to keep your chimney unblocked. Chief Chimney Services, Inc.wants to be your chimney professional. Contact us today!

Spring Into Action

Spring Into Action This Spring & Have Your Annual Chimney Inspection

The importance of having a yearly inspection and evaluation of your chimney cannot be stressed strongly enough. When your health and safety are at risk, it is important make sure you call a trained professional to evaluate and clean your chimney and its components on annual basis. Chief Chimney Services, Inc. has earned the prestigious credentials of certified chimney sweep from the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) to perform a complete evaluation and inspection in order to keep your venting operating at peak capacity, controlling energy consumption and costs, and protect you from fire and toxic gas hazards.

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Spring is the ideal time to have your inspections performed.

Our mothers and grandmothers used the end of winter to signal time for their spring cleaning. A thorough cleaning helped make the transition from the demands of winter to the demands of summer. Springtime is an excellent time to also have a professional inspection of your chimney performed.

The National Fire Protection Association Standard 211 says, “Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents shall be inspected at least once a year for soundness, freedom from deposits, and correct clearances. Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs shall be done if necessary.”

During the winter, you use your chimney more than other times during the year. The residue from your fires builds up in your fireplace and chimney. Not only that, the masonry of your chimney is subjected to temperature changes as the weather freezes and thaws. These temperature changes can cause cracks, leaks, and lose bricks which allow water, smoke, and toxic gasses to seep back into your home. In addition, since your chimney is warm, birds and animals may decide to make your chimney home for the winter and then may die or get trapped inside and cause dangers.

3 Levels of Inspection as described by the Chimney Safety Institute of America*

Level 1 Inspections –During a Level 1 inspection, your chimney service technician examines the readily accessible portions of the chimney exterior, interior and accessible portions of the appliance and the chimney connection. The technician will also verify the chimney is free of obstruction and combustible deposits.

Level 2 Inspections –A Level 2 inspection is required when any changes are made to the system. Level 2 inspections are required when property is sold or transferred. Fires, seismic events, and weather events are reasons for a Level 2 inspection.

Level 3 Inspection – Includes all the areas and items checked in a Level 1 and a Level 2 inspection, as well as the removal of certain components of the building or chimney where necessary. When serious hazards are suspected, a Level 3 inspection may well be required to determine the condition of the chimney system.

* See more here.

The Department of Consumer Protection echoes the recommendations of property experts, fire departments, insurance companies, and chimney professionals in all 50 states, “Have your chimney inspected and cleaned, preferably in late spring or early summer when heating season is over. That way, you’ll have enough time to schedule any repairs you may need before the heating season begins in the fall.”

Carbon Monoxide and Your Fireplace

Summer has officially ended, which means the next frigid New York winter is one season closer. As everyone starts putting away t-shirts and short and pulling out parkas and mittens, homeowners have another task on their minds. Winter is also fireplace season, so everyone is flocking to have their chimneys swept and inspected. Those who neglect to service their fireplaces and chimneys this year are putting the health of their families and homes at risk. While there are a variety of different risks associated with a fireplace in disrepair, none is more insidious than carbon monoxide.

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What Is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is small gaseous molecule that results from all types of combustion. This means that carbon monoxide is present in car exhaust, stoves, lanterns, wood- and charcoal-burning units, and gas ranges. If the fuel burns in an enclosed space, the carbon monoxide product quickly builds up in the air. As the concentration of carbon monoxide in the air increases, so does the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. To make matters worse, you cannot tell if deadly gas is present by smell or taste or sight. Only a specialized carbon monoxide detector can determine its presence.

Poisoning by carbon monoxide can occur within minutes depending on the size of the space and the rate at which it fills up. The carbon monoxide enters the blood stream after inhalation and attaches to the red blood cells before the oxygen has a chance. Thus, carbon monoxide is distributed throughout the body in place of the absolutely vital oxygen, eventually resulting in severe tissue damage and death. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, nausea, and confusion. If the victim is not moved to clean air, unconsciousness quickly ensues. The early symptoms mimic much less dangerous illnesses, so many people do not think about moving to an open area.

What Does This Have To Do With My Fireplace?

Carbon monoxide is a product of any type of burning, so if your fireplace burns wood, charcoal, pellets or gas, it produces carbon monoxide. A properly installed fireplace and chimney should safely vent the carbon monoxide out of the home, but a number of issues can arise to hamper that ability.

Any type of chimney obstruction contributes to the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. If the path of gases up the flue is blocked, the gases will back up into the home. Different types of obstructions include animals, nests, or a dirty chimney. You can have a mason install a chimney cap to prevent animals from living and building nests inside the flue. To prevent creosote and other fire products from building up and closing off the flue, you should have your chimney swept and inspected at least once per year.

While obstruction is the most common cause for carbon monoxide in the home, you should schedule an inspection with a professional chimney sweep company to determine if your fireplace poses any other types of risks. If you live in the Suffolk County area of Long Island, New York, contact Chief Chimney Services, Inc. for a professional consultation.

By John Pilger on September 30th, 2014 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on Carbon Monoxide and Your Fireplace